5 Things That Happen When You Take Action – Just Do It

5 Things That Happen When You Take Action – Just Do It

5 Things That Happen When You Take Action – Just Do It!

06

FEBRUARY 2019

Samuel Osho
Nike’s iconic slogan – “Just do it” is a powerful tag line that creates an atmosphere of urgency needed for taking action. It has morphed from a famous motto to an axiom that embodies the criterion for success in life. Life naturally rewards those who take action. Yes, the doers and not necessarily the over-thinkers.

 

No one cares how much you know about writing until you begin to write. It may be hard for people to believe that you are a superb chef until you start cooking meals. In a nutshell, excellent knowledge about a subject matter is insufficient in the school of success, you must take action in the right direction with what you know.

 

When you are on the verge of executing a project, have you noticed how easy it is to be bogged down in the strategy room with volumes of data? You love to stay in the spheres of planning and analyzing because it gives you a false belief that you are making progress.

Often, a movement is confused with progress. When you are moving in circles, you are engaged in an activity because of your mobility, but progress is halted. The hardest part of any project is the launch because it brings you face to face with your fears and doubts. How then do you get results or measure impact when you do everything else but take action?

Unfortunately, the world only celebrates those who get results. I believe that getting results is pivotal to your overall success in life. Results amplify your impact, and it’s a testament to the quality of the knowledge you have amassed.

What are you waiting for? It’s time for you to take action – join a speaking club, enroll in the course, start the business, write the book, do the assignment, call the coach, or start the music lessons.

To be honest, it’s time to take a break from “analysis paralysis” and learn the art of getting things done. High achievers master the art of ruthless execution.

Taking action triggers a chain of reactions that will lead you to your success. These are some of the things that will happen when you begin to take action despite your fears.

5 Things That Happen When You Take Action

1. People take you seriously

Imagine you have always introduced yourself to your community as a writer but no one has seen any of your literary works. You call yourself a writer, but you do everything else except writing.

People won’t take you seriously until they see you do things that resonate with your professed identity. That’s the way it works. If you want people to start paying attention to you and the things you care about, you have to take action – step out today.

2. You attract people with similar goals

What happens when you take the plunge and start your business as a Master of Ceremony for Corporate events? You draw the attention of all the key players on that turf – both the newcomers and the experts.

Taking action means taking your foot off the brake pedal and joining the race to the peak of flawless performance. In this new venture birthed by taking action, you will produce results which will attract others to you. Some of the people you draw will support and encourage you.

“Things may come to those who wait, but only the things left by those who hustle.” – Abraham Lincoln, Sixteenth president of the United States

3. You learn from experience

Nothing holds people back like fears, doubts, and uncertainties. You are probably afraid that you don’t have enough knowledge required as a baseline for starters. You will be surprised that folks out there with massive influence don’t even know as much as you know. The difference between both parties is execution – they take action.

Former British prime minister, William Gladstone once said, “No man ever became great or good except through many and great mistakes.” What’s the worst that can happen when you step out? Let’s assume you make a mistake, you fail, and everything crumbles. Well, that’s not the end, you have to learn from your “great mistakes” and keep moving. Brace up and keep learning from your unique experience. There are many things you will learn when you decide to take action and face your fears.

4. You begin to get feedback

As a writer, when you start a blog or publish a book, it’s more like putting yourself out there. Criticisms will come tumbling down – both destructive and constructive. You begin to get feedback about your work from your readers.
In their book, The One Minute Manager, Ken Blanchard and Spencer Johnson said, “Feedback is the breakfast of champions.” When you take action, you open yourself to feedback which will stimulate your growth.

 

5. You gain clarity

No one has it all figured out, clarity comes when you immerse yourself in the journey of becoming. How do you know the prospect of a business idea you have not executed? How do you know if a book will sell when you have not published it? How do you know you will be a superb public speaker when you are yet to give your first speech? Taking action is all you need to sift the tares from the wheat. You will be equipped with insight to know what works and what does not work for you.

Conclusion

In conclusion, you have nothing to lose when you take action. Execution propels you on the paths of excellence and clothes you in the regalia of success.

 

What are the five things that will make you happy and drive you towards your overall goals if you can get them done before the week runs out?
Go for them!
Just do it!

Do you have an idea that you would like to share with me?

How to Ace Your Daily Goals Like a Pro: 7 Tips That Work

How to Ace Your Daily Goals Like a Pro: 7 Tips That Work

How to Ace Your Daily Goals Like a Pro: 7 Tips That Work

28

JANUARY, 2019

Samuel Osho

It’s the last week of the first month of the year and you may be lost in mixed feelings. Do you deserve a sharp reprimand for missing your goals or a pat on the back for a job well done? In this self-reflection class, you have to own up and be true to yourself. As 2019 strolls by, are you making every day count? A fabulous year can end in an ordinary way if you lack the energy and enthusiasm to ace your daily goals. 

To be honest, I know how it feels when you have a list of daily goals with unchecked boxes staring at you. If you pride yourself as one, who is a pro in getting things done, missing your goals could be worrisome. To make matters worse, the pace at which your days disappear, you silently wish that you can have more than 24 hours in a day. 

Time is one of the equally distributed resources – everyone has access to the same 24 hours in a day. Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckerberg and you all have the same 24 hours but how come they seem to be getting more out of their day. Perhaps there is something they do, but you ignore. 

If 2019 will be different for you regarding results, then you have to be intentional about how to excel at your daily goals. Here are some tips that work:

 

7 Tips That Work

1. Create a list of your daily goals

The rule is if anything is important to you, then you have to write it down. Writing your goals gives you an opportunity to think things through and put these tasks in the front burner of your brain.

A list of daily goals serves as a reminder when you are lost in the pool of daily activities. In fact, research has shown that people who write down their goals on a regular basis are more likely to achieve them when compared to those who just have it in their heads.

I have a friend who has a daily ritual of writing his life goals in a journal every day. He described this habit as a powerful motivator and a superb drive for amplifying his productivity. 

What do you want to accomplish today? Do you have it on a list?

2. Do one thing at a time

The power of focus cannot be underestimated when it comes to productivity and execution. I have found doing one thing at a time extremely powerful and magical.

When you don’t narrow down on a single task at a time, you spread yourself too thin and become less effective. You can’t boil an ocean but can boil a jug of water – focus on one thing at a time, finish it and move to the next task. The Focusbooster app can be of great assistance in this regard. 

In the next thirty minutes, which task are you going to give undivided attention? Just focus and get it done. 

“If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or things.” – Albert Einstein

3. Start with the big tasks

It usually happens that when you have a long list of daily goals, you unconsciously start with the easy ones first and end up not doing the hard ones. Often, you are unable to finish the difficult tasks when you follow this sequence because you are usually exhausted even before you start them.

Start your day with the execution of significant and challenging tasks. Expend your fresh energy on the tough assignments and finish them before moving to the easy and simple ones. Interestingly, when you muster the strength to complete an arduous task, you get the motivation to keep moving.

On your list of goals for today, which one is the hardest? Let it be the first task you have to face. Go for it! 

4. Reward yourself

When you get the job done, learn to celebrate your small victories and reward yourself. You deserve some accolades for a job well done.

The Pomodoro technique developed by Francesco Cirillo works based on the principle of rewarding yourself with a five minutes break after twenty-five minutes of uninterrupted work.

Surprisingly, this system works like magic. For example, you can say that you are only qualified to watch your favorite TV show if you score well above 90% in the execution of your daily goals. Watching the TV show is a reward for acing your goals.

The anticipation of relishing a pleasure you derive from your leisure time can be a driving force to complete your daily tasks on time.

After an hour of steady focus on completing a task, don’t you think you deserve a 10-minute break? 

5. Learn to say No

We are naturally wired to say yes to almost every offer. But to stay productive and effective, you must learn to say No. You just can’t accept every invitation to be of help to others.

If it clashes with your schedule, learn to say No or reschedule to what suits your priorities. If you say Yes to people and you don’t have the time to attend to their needs, they will eventually feel terrible when you let them down.

So, why don’t you just say No if it does not work for you rather than trying to please everyone?

Take a critical look at your commitments this week, maybe you need to say No to some of them to increase your productivity. 

6. Starve your distractions

In these days, you have more enemies of progress than you thought. In fact, your most prized gadget – your sleek smartphone can be an obstacle between you and achieving your goals.

Staying on your phone all day can rob you of the precious time that could have been invested in pursuing your goals. When you are set to get a lot of productive work done, you can put your phone in a “do not disturb” mode.

Another way of curbing distractions from social media is to have specific times of the day that you visit these apps on your phone.

Be sincere, do you really need to visit Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn every 20 minutes? Install these apps to block your access to social media accounts for a specific period of time – Freedom and Cold Turkey.

7. Get an accountability partner

If you know someone that believes in you and is passionately interested in your success. You can ask if they are willing to be your accountability partner.

Having someone to share the list of your daily goals with is priceless. At the end of the day, a five-minute chat can be used to evaluate how you fared and right there you will see the room for continuous improvement.

Draft a mail and send to two friends asking if they will be willing to be your accountability partners. You can stick to a daily or weekly review, whichever works for you is fine. 

Conclusion

Success does not come suddenly, but it builds up one day at a time when we imbibe the art of investing heavily in every passing moment. See each day as an avenue to bake a brick needed for building a monument of greatness.
I have listed only seven tips here and this is far from being exhaustive, please feel free to add more tips that can increase daily productivity in the comment box below. Thanks.

5 Powerful Mentoring Relationships that Influenced the World

5 Powerful Mentoring Relationships that Influenced the World

5 Powerful Mentoring Relationships that Influenced the World
12
AUGUST, 2018
Samuel Osho
It looks like everyone on your timeline has it all figured out except you. In fact, you are a superstar when you can tell a story of how you made it from grass to grace, all by yourself. I am seeking the attention of a generation that continually denigrates the importance of mentoring.
You think that your story will lose its flavor when you add stances of when you were helpless, and a mentor’s wealth of experience brought you back on track. You are telling a big lie when you create an impression that you are an island of knowledge.
If you are on a journey to a location for the very first time, to reduce your chances of getting lost, you can ask for directions from a guide. Or better still, use Google Map and follow the instructions until you get to your destination.
Of course, you are smarter than folks that think they can reach their destination through guesses and permutations. You are smart because you conserve energy and you save time. This ultimately reflects in your speed and refreshing look when you get to your destination. No beating around the bush, you went straight to the point.
Life is a journey and if you know where you are going, finding the right mentor can be the gamechanger. Mentoring is a highly rewarding experience but before you start looking for a mentor, make sure you provide answers to these eight questions.

 

To drive home the importance of mentoring, I have decided to share stories of five powerful mentoring relationships that influenced the world.

 

5 Mentoring Relationships

1. Socrates mentored Plato

You don’t need to attend a philosophy class before you know these names – Socrates and Plato. Both are pillars in Greek philosophy and the bedrock of what makes modern philosophers stay awake at night.
Interestingly, despite the popularity of Socrates today, there is no record of his writings before his death which is strange for a philosopher of his class. Socrates is credited as the founder of Western philosophy and contributed immensely to ethics as the first moral philosopher.
All that you learnt in school about Socrates were chiefly the works of his followers and students. This is where Plato comes in, he is often regarded as the “best disciple of Socrates.” Some of the best and detailed accounts of Socrates’ work stemmed from the writings of Plato.

 

If Socrates covered the first thousand miles of Greek philosophy, Plato perhaps paced through the next five thousand miles. Plato did more than contributing to Western philosophy, he laid the foundations for Western science and mathematics.
The success of Plato surpassed the achievements of Socrates, Plato founded the first institution of higher learning in the Western World – the Academy in Athens. Plato also passed the torch of knowledge to another great philosopher, he only paid it forward.

 

2. Plato mentored Aristotle

It’s interesting to see a trend in Classical Greece that preserved the excellent knowledge of great philosophers. At the age of 17 or 18, Aristotle enrolled in Plato’s Academy in Athens and remained Plato’s student until he turned 37.

 

He is known as the “Father of Western Philosophy.” The teachings of Aristotle served as the first comprehensive system of Western philosophy. The principle of kinematics developed by Galileo Galilei and William Harvey’s explanation of blood circulation in the human body were both reactions to the writings of Aristotle.
To prove that the torch of knowledge passed down the line burned with much intensity, Aristotle’s writings moved beyond the tents of philosophy to poetry, science, linguistics, politics, government, and economics. Although he did not establish an academy like Plato, he started a library in Lyceum after Plato’s death.

“If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” – Isaac Newton

3. Aristotle mentored Alexander the Great

Shortly after Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens and moved to the palace of King Philip II of Macedon. Aristotle had a paid job in the palace as a tutor for King Philip’s son, Alexander the Great. Alexander was under the tutelage of Aristotle during his youth until age 16. After King Philip’s assassination, Alexander the Great became the King of Macedonia at the age of 20.
Though he died at the age of 32, Alexander the Great is widely regarded as one of the greatest military commanders in history. He never lost a battle. He created one of the largest empires in the ancient world at a young age of 30. His kingdom extended from Greece to northwestern India.

4. George Wythe mentored Thomas Jefferson

If you know a bit of American history, these names will sound familiar because they played vital roles in America’s Independence. George Wythe was a renowned classics scholar and America’s first law professor.

He was a notable law professor at the College of William & Mary and served as a teacher to a sizeable number of prominent American leaders. Amidst his mentees, he was exceptionally close to Thomas Jefferson.

Jefferson showcased the brilliance of one that was well-taught by a sage – he was both an exceptional leader and a superb writer.
When it was time for America to craft its Declaration of Independence, the leader of the Continental Congress, John Adams, persuaded the committee to select Thomas Jefferson as its principal author. When you read the Declaration of Independence, you are reading the writings of Jefferson.
Jefferson, alongside his mentor, George Wythe were two out of the seven Virginia signatories of the United States Declaration of Independence. He authored the Declaration in July 1776 and later served two terms as America’s third President from 1801 to 1809 after serving as the nation’s first Secretary of State under President George Washington.

5. Benjamin Graham mentored Warren Buffett

Finally, one of my examples has one of its legends living with us. Warren Buffet, while he was in his early twenties, met a man who changed his perspective on investment and perhaps changed the course of his life forever.
Benjamin Graham was a British-born American economist, investor, and professor. He etched his name in history as the “father of value investing,” and authored two stellar books that have served as a collage of timeless investment principles.
Perhaps, one of his greatest investments was mentoring the young and energetic Warren Buffet who has grown to become the wizard of value investing in the world. Buffet worked in Graham’s company for two years before Graham’s retirement into full-time academic roles.
Buffet learnt the trade from his master, and he is undoubtedly one of the most successful investors in the world with a net worth close to US$84 billion.

Conclusion

It’s clear from these examples that mentoring has stood the test of time as one of the strategies used by champions to reach their destination in destiny. English physicist, Isaac Newton, once said: “If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” The further you can see into your future, the more you become confident in its possibility.

 

What are you waiting for? Embrace mentoring and find the right mentors in your field of interest. Do you know of any other mentoring relationship that has influenced the world? Please feel free to share in the comment section below.

5 Amazing Tips on How to Resume Writing After a Long Break

5 Amazing Tips on How to Resume Writing After a Long Break

5 Amazing Tips on How to Resume Writing After a Long Break
01
AUGUST, 2018
Samuel Osho
As a student, the toughest time to read is when you are fresh in school from a long break. It’s hard to concentrate and get the reading done. Digesting two pages of course content is a headache and pouncing on a chapter is a battle.
Your favorite places are library halls and reading rooms because you are “roaming for a network.” Perhaps, you could call it the calibration of the body and soul to a condition that can confidently assure you of assimilation. The same is true when you plan to resume active writing after a long break.

For writers, taking a protracted break from writing can happen due to several reasons. It could result from a barrage of unforeseen contingencies or a product of sheer laziness. Regardless of the cause of the break, when resumption beckons, it’s usually the hardest part.

Asides the tendency to churn out insipid works, you grapple for the right words to express your thoughts, you suffer from an absence of punchlines, and the drought of inspiration. Some of your readers wonder why your recent works are so bland and shallow. It’s a pathetic state.
What if I can show you how to insert the key in the ignition and jump-start your writing engine? Yes, that’s why I am here. This blog post will show you five simple ways to resume writing after a long break.
5 Simple Tricks

1. Write about the things you are grateful for

The goal is to get you to write, and you can start by writing about the things you are grateful for. If you think genuinely, you will discover a long list of things that fuel your gratitude. You can write at least three sentences about each item on the list to express the details of your euphoric feeling.
From a generic level, go more in-depth to the degree that exudes a detailed description of what makes you go head over heels about the things you are grateful for. Furthermore, researchers have shown that keeping a gratitude journal can make you more optimistic and happier about life.

2. Summarize lessons from your favorite books

It’s advisable to read as much as you can while trying to revive your creative juices. You can re-read some of your favorite books or read a new one from your wish list. From your latest read, you can create a summary of the key points from the book, you can also itemize lessons that you would love to apply to your life practically.

During this exercise, focus on writing your reflections either by supporting or disagreeing with the author’s standpoint. In all, let your voice stand out and shun mindless lifting. Don’t fall into the trap of rewriting the author’s work verbatim because that’s not writing, it is called photocopying.

“If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot.” – Stephen King

3. Share about an unforgettable experience

As you go about your life, you will have some unforgettable moments etched in your memories. Either they are broken shards of events that happened recently or in the distant past, but they seem not to get out of your head. You can embrace these memories and give them life by writing about them.

Asides reliving these moments, you also flex your writing muscles and paint images of your sacred moments in letters. When you are finally done with this exercise, it will leave you levitating in a creative atmosphere with your lungs full of euphoria. It’s a magical feeling!

4. Comment on your favorite quote

I have some quotes that are stuck in my head – I love them because they inspire me. You might have just one quote that gives you goosebumps or motivates you to chase your crazy dreams. This is the time to bring such quotes from the dusty shelves to the front porches. Take time to think about one of these quotes and write at least 300 words on what the quote means to you.

5. Write a letter to your younger self

If you are in a position to advise your younger self, what will you say? This is a fun-filled exercise. The last time I did this exercise got me reeling in laughter and trust me I had so much to say to my younger self. By the time I was done with the young lad, I have garnered close to 500 words.
Just some tips to accentuate your flow while writing this letter – focus on your eccentricities, expose your childhood adventures, and flog your youthful exuberance with words of discipline. Here’s a good place to start: celebrities you admire took time to advise a younger version of themselves – from Oprah Winfrey to Gabrielle Union.

Conclusion

If you are able to engage in two or more of these exercises, you will be amazed at how quickly you find your writing frequency. You will be surprised at the pace of your pen sprinting like Usain Bolt on a blank papyrus. Give yourself some time, enjoy the process, and you will soon find yourself grooving in a pool of inspired letters. You can also share some of these new write-ups on your social media account and let your audience have a feel of your seasoned thoughts.
If you have some other tips that you think will be of great help to a writer launching out of a sabbatical, kindly drop them in the comment section below. Gracias!

6 Things to Consider Before Writing a Book

6 Things to Consider Before Writing a Book

6 Things to Consider Before Writing a Book

14

MAY, 2018

Samuel Osho
I have heard on several occasions that winners don’t quit and quitters don’t win.
But I really wanted to quit. Yes, I wanted to quit writing. I wanted to join the growing list of writers who execute their creative pens on the gallows of fear.
I felt it was time to close that chapter of my life not until I spoke with one of my friends – a published author. Prior to this conversation, we became close friends after I read his first book which I consider to be a brilliant literary meal for intellectual minds.
He took his time to itemize a million reasons why I should not quit writing. I guess his words stuck and that’s why I am still here.

 

 

He told me how he fought self-doubt and summoned the courage to publish his first book. The book was scripted in 1993 but was unpublished until 2016.

Oh! Why did it take so long before hitting the press?

To be honest, writing a book is one thing, having the audacity to publish it is another. And on to the next step, marketing the book is a different game.

You are probably at a crossroad wondering if the time is ripe for the unveiling of your book. The headache is usually intense if this is your debut appearance in the hallway of published authors.

Self-doubt peers at you from its hole and lack of confidence in your ideas threaten to heighten the span of your indecision. Writers often ask for pointers to know when their ideas are worth sharing. Perhaps, you have pondered on the same question.

Providing answers to the six questions listed here will shed more clarity on the future of your book.

The Six Questions Begging for Answers

1. What’s the idea behind your book?

I always advise writers to stick with one idea per book. I love the way Myles Munroe describes books, he called them “Idea-containers.” Yes, that’s true. A great book contains a revolutionary idea that can be summarized in two or three sentences.
Robert Kiyosaki’s Rich Dad Poor Dad was all about one idea – learning financial education as the key to realizing financial freedom.
Seth Godin’s Purple Cow dramatically played down on the antics of advertising and canvassed for the creation of remarkable products.

 

Today, these books are bestsellers because they contain clear and simple ideas. These ideas were reinforced with a wealth of research mixed with experiential knowledge. An idea is powerful but it’s not enough.

2. Do you believe in the idea?

It’s okay to have great ideas but do they come from your heart. Ideas that come from your heart and soul are the ones that will stir the hearts of others. When an idea works its way from your head to your heart, it becomes an inseparable part of you.

 

Yes, you believe in it. This is very important! It’s important you write from your heart.
If you don’t believe in the idea you are about to share in a book, it will be obvious when you talk about the book to others. When the unbelief festers unattended to, it spreads like cancer when you talk to others about the book. Address it now!

3. Is your idea worth sharing?

TED’s slogan – “Ideas worth spreading,” encapsulates the genius behind the millions of views that greet TED Talks on YouTube. Talks from TED keep garnering millions of views across the world because the speeches contain ideas that are worth sharing/spreading.
Some ideas are just good enough for you; they have got no potential to attain global relevance. Why waste time sharing such ideas in a book? Despite writing the book in Johannesburg, can someone in Argentina be guaranteed of outstanding results after applying your idea?
If the idea contained in your book is worth sharing, you will spend less on marketing and advertising. This is the secret to creating a book that eventually becomes an “ideavirus.” Your book is an ideavirus when readers can’t resist talking about it and sharing it with others.

4. Have you experienced what you are writing about?

There are some books you can’t get out of your head because you felt a connection between yourself and the author. Often, it’s more like an emotional bond – a part that reminds us of our humanity. The author shares lucid descriptions about his experiences and it turns out to be a perfect reflection of your current ordeal.

 

That was how I felt when I read John Maxwell’s 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership. At that time, I just assumed a new leadership role and was looking for insights on how to effectively lead my life and manage people. Maxwell’s book on leadership gave me goosebumps as I could see myself as he shared his experiences. And now to the best part, he did not just talk about my predicament, he cracked the code and offered solutions.

5. Do you have proven and tested solutions?

As a rule of thumb, whenever I am faced with a challenge, I consult books before calling my mentors. I spend a lot on books because they have proven to be a mine of solutions.
It’s unfair to make vague promises or polish lies as click baits. Can the idea in your book offer solutions? Have you tested your idea? Do you have proven solutions to the problems of your readers? We buy books because we are looking for answers. We can’t just live without finding answers to our numerous questions. Unanswered questions make us restless and that’s why Google is making a hell of a fortune.
Proven solutions reinforce the integrity of your book and increase its selling power.

“Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand.” – George Orwell

6. Do you have a market for the book?

Many authors end their publishing career with the first book because their financial expectations were frustrated. After the glamour on the day of the book launch, it looked more like shoving the book down people’s throat. The little sales were proceeds from close friends and family members who felt obliged to offer a pitiable gesture towards a friend’s audacious leap.
Publishing a book can be financially demanding especially if you stick with traditional publishing. Some writers have landed in debts because of inability to realize enough sales to offset the cost of publishing their books. If you don’t have a market for your book, publishing it can be a disaster.
I know that writers are lovers of art who care less about the financial side of things. But with the recent twist in the publishing industry where few publishers do marketing, writers are challenged daily to learn strategies for marketing their books.
Just to be on the safe side, do your market research before heading to the press. Are people in high demand for these ideas?

 

If you echoed YES to all these questions, then you are ready to write and publish your book. Self-doubt will take care of itself and you are on your way to scripting one of the bestsellers that will make readers smile again.

 

Pin It on Pinterest