6 Things to Consider Before Writing a Book

6 Things to Consider Before Writing a Book

6 Things to Consider Before Writing a Book

14

MAY, 2018

Samuel Osho
I have heard on several occasions that winners don’t quit and quitters don’t win.
But I really wanted to quit. Yes, I wanted to quit writing. I wanted to join the growing list of writers who execute their creative pens on the gallows of fear.
I felt it was time to close that chapter of my life not until I spoke with one of my friends – a published author. Prior to this conversation, we became close friends after I read his first book which I consider to be a brilliant literary meal for intellectual minds.
He took his time to itemize a million reasons why I should not quit writing. I guess his words stuck and that’s why I am still here.

 

 

He told me how he fought self-doubt and summoned the courage to publish his first book. The book was scripted in 1993 but was unpublished until 2016.

Oh! Why did it take so long before hitting the press?

To be honest, writing a book is one thing, having the audacity to publish it is another. And on to the next step, marketing the book is a different game.

You are probably at a crossroad wondering if the time is ripe for the unveiling of your book. The headache is usually intense if this is your debut appearance in the hallway of published authors.

Self-doubt peers at you from its hole and lack of confidence in your ideas threaten to heighten the span of your indecision. Writers often ask for pointers to know when their ideas are worth sharing. Perhaps, you have pondered on the same question.

Providing answers to the six questions listed here will shed more clarity on the future of your book.

The Six Questions Begging for Answers

1. What’s the idea behind your book?

I always advise writers to stick with one idea per book. I love the way Myles Munroe describes books, he called them “Idea-containers.” Yes, that’s true. A great book contains a revolutionary idea that can be summarized in two or three sentences.
Robert Kiyosaki’s Rich Dad Poor Dad was all about one idea – learning financial education as the key to realizing financial freedom.
Seth Godin’s Purple Cow dramatically played down on the antics of advertising and canvassed for the creation of remarkable products.

 

Today, these books are bestsellers because they contain clear and simple ideas. These ideas were reinforced with a wealth of research mixed with experiential knowledge. An idea is powerful but it’s not enough.

2. Do you believe in the idea?

It’s okay to have great ideas but do they come from your heart. Ideas that come from your heart and soul are the ones that will stir the hearts of others. When an idea works its way from your head to your heart, it becomes an inseparable part of you.

 

Yes, you believe in it. This is very important! It’s important you write from your heart.
If you don’t believe in the idea you are about to share in a book, it will be obvious when you talk about the book to others. When the unbelief festers unattended to, it spreads like cancer when you talk to others about the book. Address it now!

3. Is your idea worth sharing?

TED’s slogan – “Ideas worth spreading,” encapsulates the genius behind the millions of views that greet TED Talks on YouTube. Talks from TED keep garnering millions of views across the world because the speeches contain ideas that are worth sharing/spreading.
Some ideas are just good enough for you; they have got no potential to attain global relevance. Why waste time sharing such ideas in a book? Despite writing the book in Johannesburg, can someone in Argentina be guaranteed of outstanding results after applying your idea?
If the idea contained in your book is worth sharing, you will spend less on marketing and advertising. This is the secret to creating a book that eventually becomes an “ideavirus.” Your book is an ideavirus when readers can’t resist talking about it and sharing it with others.

4. Have you experienced what you are writing about?

There are some books you can’t get out of your head because you felt a connection between yourself and the author. Often, it’s more like an emotional bond – a part that reminds us of our humanity. The author shares lucid descriptions about his experiences and it turns out to be a perfect reflection of your current ordeal.

 

That was how I felt when I read John Maxwell’s 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership. At that time, I just assumed a new leadership role and was looking for insights on how to effectively lead my life and manage people. Maxwell’s book on leadership gave me goosebumps as I could see myself as he shared his experiences. And now to the best part, he did not just talk about my predicament, he cracked the code and offered solutions.

5. Do you have proven and tested solutions?

As a rule of thumb, whenever I am faced with a challenge, I consult books before calling my mentors. I spend a lot on books because they have proven to be a mine of solutions.
It’s unfair to make vague promises or polish lies as click baits. Can the idea in your book offer solutions? Have you tested your idea? Do you have proven solutions to the problems of your readers? We buy books because we are looking for answers. We can’t just live without finding answers to our numerous questions. Unanswered questions make us restless and that’s why Google is making a hell of a fortune.
Proven solutions reinforce the integrity of your book and increase its selling power.

“Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand.” – George Orwell

6. Do you have a market for the book?

Many authors end their publishing career with the first book because their financial expectations were frustrated. After the glamour on the day of the book launch, it looked more like shoving the book down people’s throat. The little sales were proceeds from close friends and family members who felt obliged to offer a pitiable gesture towards a friend’s audacious leap.
Publishing a book can be financially demanding especially if you stick with traditional publishing. Some writers have landed in debts because of inability to realize enough sales to offset the cost of publishing their books. If you don’t have a market for your book, publishing it can be a disaster.
I know that writers are lovers of art who care less about the financial side of things. But with the recent twist in the publishing industry where few publishers do marketing, writers are challenged daily to learn strategies for marketing their books.
Just to be on the safe side, do your market research before heading to the press. Are people in high demand for these ideas?

 

If you echoed YES to all these questions, then you are ready to write and publish your book. Self-doubt will take care of itself and you are on your way to scripting one of the bestsellers that will make readers smile again.

 

7 Fascinating Life Lessons From the Eagle

7 Fascinating Life Lessons From the Eagle

7 Fascinating Life Lessons from the Eagle
07

MAY, 2018

Samuel Osho
In centuries of human existence, a bird of significant strength has inspired a lot of people. It is one of the largest birds in the world, the Eagle – a symbol of bravery, courage, power, strength, and superiority.
Little wonder, it has found its way to the national symbols of 27 nations, the popular ones are the coat of arms of Germany, the Great Seal of the United States, the coat of arms of Nigeria, the coat of arms of Mexico, and the coat of arms of Ghana.
A trip to an eyrie will open your eyes to the mystery behind the embodiment of strength and uniqueness that an Eagle possesses. Eagles are powerfully-built birds of prey with a heavy head and beak.
There are however lessons to learn from Eagles. If you imbibe these lessons, you will soar above life’s challenges like an Eagle.
The Seven Fascinating Life Lessons

1. Keen Eyesight

Eagles have extremely powerful eyes which are up to 3.6 times human acuity. This is primarily because of their large pupils which ensure minimal diffraction (scattering) of the incoming light. They use their eyes for long-distance focus and clarity.
They are always alert as they keep watch on their territories. They are not caught unawares by predators and they spot their enemies from afar. They are not myopic, they are a step ahead of their prey and a hundred miles ahead of their competitors.

Lesson:

Anyone who will go far in life must have a vision with absolute clarity void of ambiguities. Make plans and don’t live for the moment. Don’t ever underestimate a man with focus and great vision, he will not only make a great leader but he will also live a meaningful life as he leads his life towards the gates of destiny.

2. High Flyers

Often, you must have heard this expression; “Soar high like an Eagle” and not “Soar high like a hawk”. This is because only Eagles have the intrinsic ability to soar. Soaring means to fly aloft with little effort, to rise or mount upward on wings in a rapidly or unusually high manner.

Eagles soar and this separates them from mingling with other birds. They are in a class of their own – a superior class up there that other birds long to be. Eagles can fly up to an altitude of 10,000 feet and they are able to land quickly to catch a prey.

Lesson:

High flyers stand out of the crowds; they live an outstanding life. When you soar high above obstacles, you create an extraordinary class of your own. You have got impeccable standards and your meaning of success does not necessarily need to be the same with the definition of others.

The journey in the outstanding lane comes at a price – it can be very lonely but be rest assured that you have got enough space to spread your wings for dominance and unrivaled influence.

3. High Builders

Eagles are not just high flyers, they are not temporary lovers of high flights, but they build nests in high places. When they fly up there, they scream loud; “We are here to stay, we are not going back down there.” Class is permanent but form is temporary. They craft nests in tall trees and high cliffs as a place of fortress and abode. They have an insignia which denotes greatness and an unrepentant urge to stay at the top always.

Lesson:

In life, when you think about greatness, don’t look at it as a destination but as a journey. Going to the land of greatness means you have decided to build a nest amidst the mountains of excellence and you are not returning to the valleys of mediocrity.

The strong proclivity for the top is just embedded deep underneath your skin and it drives you with unique spontaneity. You can’t hide it, it will always show anywhere you go because that’s what is in you – excellence!

4. Fearless

Eagles never give up and they are relentlessly focused on achieving their goal. They will never surrender to the overwhelming size or weight of their prey. They are fearless in their hunting strategies and some even prey on goats.

Lesson:

In life, we must learn to be fearless in the pursuit of success as we face the challenges on our way squarely knowing that the only option is a victory.

Victory will always come if only you are willing to dare the impossible, challenge the status quo and scare your fears till they shudder. On the other side of your fear, you will find triumph and success. Fear can make an Eagle live like a chicken.

5. Tenacious

When torrents of wind cruise in the high heavens, other birds scamper for cover but only the Eagle stays up there. In the stormy gale, an Eagle spreads its large wings, takes advantage of the raging currents and soars to greater heights. This is amazing!

Lesson:

The storms of life will come in its season, what will you do? Will you run for cover? Or you take advantage of the storm to mount on greater heights? Will you be a chicken or be an Eagle?

The tougher the storm, the greater its possibility of taking you higher. It is as simple as writing examinations in school before going to the next level. The exams in your final year are tougher than the ones in your first year.

“The eyesight for an eagle is what thought is to a man” – Dejan Stojanovic

6. Retreat for energy

Despite the wowing strength of an Eagle, the condition of its physical body begins to deteriorate when it reaches the age of 30 years. This makes its survival very difficult.
To regain its strength and vitality, it goes to a mountaintop or a cliff for a retreat which usually lasts for four to five months. It plucks off its feathers and knocks off its beak by hitting it hard against the rock.
During the retreat, the physical body undergoes a metamorphosis and new stages of the body emanate. This renewed life can last the Eagle for another thirty to forty years.

Lesson:

When the demands of life weigh into your schedule and you are almost drained, a retreat is strongly recommended to keep in constant touch with relevance. To keep the steam, a retreat is required, it helps to keep you in check and on point.

In your career or chosen field, there is a need to constantly keep up with what is going on; the latest trends, the new discoveries to remain evergreen with a dew of knowledge. The secret to public manifestation is a loaded bank account of private investments.

7. Nurture the younger generation

Eagles are known for strength and power which are handy tools for aggression. Research has shown that Eagles are very gentle and attentive to their younger ones.

They nurture and take good care of them till they reach maturity. The mother Eagle starts with a flying lesson for the eaglet when it discovers that the eaglet is up to the task. It flies in the air with the eaglet on the back of the mother Eagle; midway into the air, the Big Eagle removes itself from under the eaglet, the flying begins and the Mother Eagle catches it again. This process is repeated.

If the eaglet is a slow or coward learner, the Mother Eagle returns with the eaglet to the nest and destroys the nest right in front of the Eaglet and nudges the eaglet off the cliff to compulsory learn flying.

Lesson:

Great people invest in the younger generation by teaching them the lessons of life with love. They give their mentees daring challenges but never forget to empower and direct them in the proper way.

True success invests in others till they become successful in life. Whatever you have learnt in life, pass it on to worthy trustees and history will be kind to you.

Eagles are inspiring in unimaginable ways. Be that symbolic Eagle wherever you find yourself today.

15 Powerful Quotes from Mark Twain

15 Powerful Quotes from Mark Twain

15 Powerful Quotes from Mark Twain
18
APRIL, 2018
Samuel Osho
If you check the annals of history and carefully search for giants in English literature, you will easily come across a phenomenal writer from America – Mark Twain. Twain’s humor can crack your ribs even on a bad day.
He orchestrated a plethora of adventures for his readers – from “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” to “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,” he was a writer with a Midas touch. A therapeutic touch that makes you laugh and think at the same time.
Mark Twain was an American writer, humorist, entrepreneur, publisher, and lecturer. Interestingly, we share the same first name – Samuel. Unknown to many, Mark Twain is a pen name while the brain behind the pen is Samuel Langhorne Clemens.
He was famous in literary circles for his outstanding use of satire and humor both in prose and speech. Though some of his entrepreneurial adventures never turned out prosperous, he was one of the few writers who became wealthy through the proceeds of the pen.
As you read some of his inspiring quotes, you should consider reading at least one of his books if you are yet to do so. “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” will be a good place to start.
Here we go:
The Fifteen balls of energy

1.

“The secret of getting ahead is getting started.”

2.

“Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see.”

3.

“Forgiveness is the fragrance that the violet sheds on the heels that has crushed it.”

4.

“Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it’s time to pause and reflect.”

5.

“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear.”

6.

“You can’t depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus.”

7.

“It’s not the size of the dog in the fight, it’s the size of the fight in the dog.”

8.

“If you tell the truth, you don’t have the remember anything.”

9.

“Anger is an acid that can do more harm to the vessel in which it is stored than to anything on which it is poured.”

10.

“A person who won’t read has no advantage over one who can’t read.”

11.

“Don’t go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first.”

12.

“There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded.”

13.

“I never let schooling interfere with my education.”

14.

“Everything has its limit – iron ore cannot be educated into gold.”

15.

“The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.”

Bonus Quote: “Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too, can become great.” – Mark Twain
I am sharing these quotes because they have deeply inspired me to do more with my life. These quotes cover a range of life issues that we encounter in our daily endeavors. The words of the wise are truly treasured pearls; they guide us when in doubt of which path to follow.
It is your turn to share with me. I am curious! Which one of these quotes is your favorite? 

On Martin Luther King Jr: Your Dreams Are Still Valid

On Martin Luther King Jr: Your Dreams Are Still Valid

On Martin Luther King Jr: Your Dreams Are Still Valid

4

APRIL, 2018

Samuel Osho

Few months before Theresa May moved into 10 Downing Street, a friend told me about his dream of securing a scholarship for a course in the United Kingdom. His academic records were in sharp contrast to the grades of the past winners of this scholarship and it looked more like a wishful thinking. But he did what most people often ignore – he went to work and gave a hard push on his dreams. He pushed so hard that the universe caved in and supported the feeble knees of his dreams until they became a reality.

Ever since 1968, April 4 has been separated as a day to reflect on the illustrious life of Martin Luther King Jr. A day when one of America’s greatest civil rights activist was killed in cold blood. Though he was assassinated, his dreams lived on. In fact, his dreams did the unthinkable. Close to half-a-century after his death, his dream produced America’s first black President. King’s tenacity to fight for the freedom of the blacks was beyond passion, he embodied it.

Before his name could fit perfectly on the lips of everyone, he paid a price. He sacrificed his comfort, his sleep, his peace and his life for a cause he believed in. King’s commitment lit the flames of passion in the hearts of his followers. Little sparks here and there started a movement that crushed the ideologies and laws of White supremacists in the US.

As the world celebrates the 50th anniversary of King’s death, I have no intention of educating you about the life of Martin Luther King Jr. because a lot has been written and said about him. I am just here to give you a nudge as you pursue your dreams.

What price are you willing to pay for your dreams?

On January 26, 1956, King was arrested as part of a campaign to intimidate the bus boycotters in Montgomery. The bus boycott lasted for 382 days until victory was ascertained: the Supreme Court of the United States declared segregation laws on public transport to be unconstitutional.

Four days after the arrest, his house was bombed.
In September 1958, he had a close shave with death when he was stabbed by an assailant at a book signing held in Harlem.
On October 19, 1960, King was arrested and sentenced to four months in jail. However, he was released shortly after intervention by the Kennedy brothers, John and Robert.
On December 16, 1961, King was arrested in Albany for leading a protest without a permit.
On July 27, 1962, he was arrested and jailed for holding a prayer vigil in Albany, Georgia. He was released on August 10.
On Good Friday, April 12, 1963, King was arrested and jailed alongside Ralph Abernathy for demonstrating without a permit in Birmingham. During his days in prison, he authored his historic “Letter from Birmingham Jail.”
In May 1963, segregationists bombed Gaston Motel where King was staying.

 

On June 11, 1964, King was arrested while protesting for integration of public accommodations in St. Augustine, Florida.
On February 2, 1965, King was arrested in Selma, Alabama during a voting rights demonstration.
On August 5, 1966, a mob of angry whites stoned King while leading a march in Chicago.
On October 30, 1967, he was arrested and jailed in Birmingham for demonstrating without a permit. He spent four days in jail.

 

Before King’s dream placed him on the front cover of TIME Magazine in January 1964 as its Man of the Year, his dream landed him in jail on several occasions. He was stoned and described as crazy in the books of many. But the only reason we all read about him today was because he never gave up.
In the pursuit of your dreams, you may find yourself locked in solitude; a world of your own that makes you look like a cipher to others. People just find it hard to understand your spirited optimism about the future. Often, it looks like a prison but this is to let you know that you won’t be behind the bars forever.

 

King was popularly known for his non-violence methods of resisting opposition. Alongside his wife, Coretta, he travelled on a pilgrimage to India for a month in February 1959 to learn from the works of Mahatma Gandhi. Beyond his inspiring speeches and words that moved mountains of black segregation, he was approachable and compassionate at heart. He was special because he had immense love for the people.
At some point, while learning to use the ropes, you will need people. You can’t do it alone. You may need to reach out to a friend. Ask for the help of a mentor. Seek the counsel of others. If all you need to achieve your dream is you, then your dream is not big enough to influence the world.

 

My friend, your dreams are still valid. You can still push through the blankets of obscurity and reach out to the world with your message of hope. Your prison today maybe the discomfort you go through because of some personal sacrifices but you never can tell who your dream will inspire tomorrow.
Everyone that met King before the 1963 historic speech “I Have a Dream” knew what he stood for. He kept talking about it to everyone.

 

“If any of you are around when I have to meet my day, I don’t want a long funeral – and if you get somebody to deliver the eulogy tell him not to talk too long. Tell him not to mention that I have a Nobel Peace Prize, that’s not important. I want you to be able to say that day that I did try to feed the hungry. I want you to be able to say that day that I did try in my life to clothe those who were naked. And I want you to say that I tried to love and serve humanity” – Martin Luther King Jr.

 

Today is the best day to start writing that book and tell your friends about the song you have always wanted to write.
Many men and women have died but the best of them offered the world a gift before their last breath – a dream that outlives them. 
Your dreams are still valid. Let them breathe and let them blossom like the lilies by the riverside.

100 Redundant Expressions You Should Avoid In Writing

100 Redundant Expressions You Should Avoid In Writing

100 Redundant Expressions You Should Avoid In Writing
27
MARCH, 2018
Samuel Osho
In William Shakespeare’s famous play, Hamlet, a popular phrase was uttered in the second act by Polonius, “Brevity is the soul of wit […]” This phrase is adjudged as one of the countless witty expressions of the English writer. If wit connotes wisdom, it implies that it is of necessity for you to be brief and concise if you want to make sense either while speaking or writing.
In the heat of the jungle, the lions that go for the jugular are the ones that survive. No stories or perambulating, they go for the kill! These are writers that get the applause because they put their readers in mind while writing. Readers love writers who go straight to the point; they launch words like stones in David’s sling. In the long run, they make their words count because they are not in a race to fulfill a word count.
I am sure you can easily spot such writers in a crowd. If they are scripting a novel, they shove aside redundant expressions and clear the path as you race towards the end of the spectrum called suspense. If they are writing articles, they use powerful verbs instead of adverbs and adjectives. I know why you love them so much: it’s because they use simple language to explain everything – from chaos to serenity.
Editing is a tough turf for many writers. While you edit your work, one of the clutters you must eliminate is the use of redundant expressions or often known as needless repetitions. Am I saying don’t repeat yourself? Yes, you only need to speak once for you to be heard. To every rule, there is an exception, use repetition in the case of emphasis or clarification of a topical theme.
  
Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic speech in August 1963 but we can’t get “I have a dream” out of our heads perhaps because he repeated it eight times in his speech. So, repetition has its place. However, this article will open your eyes to some needless expressions and unnecessary duplicity that can be axed out of your writing. It will give wings to your writing. The words in parentheses should be removed.
The 100 Expressions
  1. ATM (machine)
  2. PIN (number)
  3. HIV (virus)
  4. LCD (display)
  5. GRE (exam)
  6. WASSCE (exam)
  7. RAM (memory)
  8. (live) witness
  9. (little) baby
  10. evolve (over time)
  11. (basic) necessities
  12. (basic) fundamentals
  13. (actual) facts
  14. (annual) anniversary
  15. (exploded) suddenly
  16. sat (down)
  17. stand (up)
  18. rise (up)
  19. raise (up)
  20. fall (down)
  21. drop (down)
  22. dwindle (down)
  23. compete (with each other)
  24. (old) adage
  25. (natural) instinct
  26. (new) innovation
  27. (new) invention
  28. (two) twins
  29. (pair of) twins
  30. (mutually) agreed
  31. (mutual) cooperation
  32. merge (together)
  33. refer (back) to your notes
  34. (armed) gunman
  35. (necessary) prerequisites
  36. (absolutely) essential
  37. (unexpected) emergency
  38. (original) founder
  39. (first and) foremost
  40. (brief) summary
  41. (free) gift
  42. (finally) completed
  43. (final) conclusion
  44. (final) outcome
  45. (final) end
  46. (final) ultimatum
  47. (prior) planning
  48. (advance) planning
  49. (each) individual
  50. (personally) think
  51. (annoying) pests
  52. (past) experience
  53. (new) breakthrough
  54. (different) kinds
  55. cancel (out)
  56. repeat (again)
  57. (foreign) imports
  58. (false) pretense
  59. (difficult) dilemma
  60. ask (a question)
  61. (invited) guests
  62. few (in number)
  63. (added) bonus
  64. enter (in)
  65. (end) result
  66. (unexpected) surprise
  67. written (down)
  68. (closed) fist
  69. (general) public
  70. (harmful) injuries
  71. grow (in size)
  72. (proposed) plan
  73. reply (back)
  74. revert (back)
  75. round (in shape)
  76. true (facts)
  77. three a.m (in the morning)
  78. (twelve) noon or midnight
  79. (white) snow
  80. undergraduate (student)
  81. (tiny) bit
  82. (regular) routine
  83. protest (against)
  84. pursue (after)
  85. close (proximity)
  86. (important) essentials
  87. cheaper (in cost)
  88. disappear (from view)
  89. (completely) eliminate
  90. advance (forward)
  91. tuna (fish)
  92. spell out (in detail)
  93. warn (in advance)
  94. (crystal) clear
  95. (in the field of) biology
  96. (in a period of) a week
  97. whether (or not)
  98. share (together)
  99. postpone (until later)
  100. kneel (down)
Let’s see how much you have learnt from this article with this short exercise. Eliminate the redundancies in the passage below:

“Mona had a difficult dilemma. She worked for a caterer, and from 9 a.m. in the morning until 12 noon, her job was to hand out free gifts at the mall. But her close personal friend Myrtle had just given birth to a baby girl, and she had promised to take care of Myrtle’s pair of twins while Myrtle was in the hospital. To Mona, the twins were annoying pests, but she would keep her promise. When Mona explained to her boss that Myrtle’s early delivery had come as an unexpected surprise, she could see the intense fury in his eyes. Silently, he prepared the different varieties of his decorative garnishes. The evil fiend then suddenly exploded and spelled out in detail why Mona was fired. Mona’s future prospects looked dim, as jobs were few in number. Mona now runs her own company, so getting fired may possibly have been her lucky break.”

Answer

“Mona had a dilemma. She worked for a caterer, and from 9 a.m. until noon, her job was to hand out gifts at the mall. But her close friend Myrtle had just given birth to a girl, and she had promised to take care of Myrtle’s twins while Myrtle was in the hospital. To Mona, the twins were pests, but she would keep her promise. When Mona explained to her boss that Myrtle’s early delivery had come as a surprise, she could see the fury in his eyes. Silently, he prepared the varieties of his garnishes. The fiend then exploded and spelled out why Mona was fired. Mona’s future looked dim, as jobs were few. Mona now runs her own company, so getting fired may have been her lucky break.”
Eliminating redundancies will be a lot easier with the following resources:
In conclusion, wordiness and vagueness in writing starve clarity of message. Your writing will be a lot better if you pay attention to these common redundancies.
If this has helped you in any way, then help me by hitting the share button (smiles). Please don’t hesitate to add to the list of redundancies in the comment section. 

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